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  • Weaving the festive mood. oct, 18 2013

    In a day and age where traditional designs of the past share the same space with outwardly ostentatious ones, designer Renu Dadlani nurtures a passion to create garments across a number of textile parallels. Her team of karigars are masters in delicate embroidery technique.
    The designer's collection is known for its intricate Parsi gara work, Kashmiri needlework, Tilla embroidery Zardosi, Mukaish and Gottapatti. Her outfits include a floor length chikankari anarkali defined by its aesthetic Kashmiri tilla border that cascades down in ripples and a transcendent rust-coloured sari with intricate Kashmiri needle work. She offers an elaborate display of her signature styles under one roof with a broad range of anarkalis, sarees, suit fabrics, lehengas, dupattas and men's kurtas on display.

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  • Romantic the moon feb, 13 2004

    This Valentine Renu Dadlani has come out with an all-season honeymoon fashion. Breaking the concept of honeymoon wear being lingerie or nightwear, the collection features a casual and sensuous look aimed at tickling the fantasy. Furthermore the collection also sets the tone for joy, happiness and much more.
    The designer's collection is known for its intricate Parsi gara work, Kashmiri needlework, Tilla embroidery Zardosi, Mukaish and Gottapatti. Her outfits include a floor length chikankari anarkali defined by its aesthetic Kashmiri tilla border that cascades down in ripples and a transcendent rust-coloured sari with intricate Kashmiri needle work. She offers an elaborate display of her signature styles under one roof with a broad range of anarkalis, sarees, suit fabrics, lehengas, dupattas and men's kurtas on display.

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  • Celebrating Vivaha 2003. jun, 18 2003

    New Delhi: Marriages may be made in heaven, but the preparations are made right here on Earth. And it is no mean task to make that perfect wedding! In a day and age when marriages are becoming talk-of-the-town show-biz events, there is more than just the groom and bride involved in the affair. It takes planning to the last detail. Hence, to make the most important day of your life more memorable, here comes the biggest wedding exhibition 'Celebrating Vivaha 2003' to be held at the Taj Palace
    The event is being organized by well-known media personality Mr Tarun Sarda, the editor and publisher of India's leading wedding magazine Celebrating Vivaha. Says Mr Sarda, "The event is an extension of our magazine which primarily focuses on the wedding segment. Today, weddings are not just a social event for the families involved. It is a commercial venture for all those individuals and companies who arrange the wedding. For instance wedding planners,destination companies, trousseau makers, fashion designers, trousseau packaging companies, et al see it as a booming market.

    A Perfect Showcase
    The wedding segment is thus a huge unorganized segment waiting to be tapped. 'Celebrating Vivaha 2003' is aimed at bringing all these businesses together under one roof and present them on a common platform wherein the customer can make an informed choice. The exhibition caters to the elite segment of the society, which is willing to pay a price to make the most important event of their lives memorable. Participants in 'Celebrating Vivaha 2003' include fashion designers, jewellery designers, wedding planners, honeymoon destinations, trousseau packers, cosmetic Companies and premium watch brands. Some of the brands taking part include international cosmetic giants such as Christian Dior Counter , La Prairie, jewellery brands such as Kaaya and InterGold, fashion designers such as Suneet Varma and Raghavendra Rathore. There are around 80 brands taking part in this mega event. Says Mr Sarda, "We are targeting the high-end customer, and hence our exhibitors are all leaders in their chosen field of business." The event will also give these businesses an opportunity to synergize their business interests and strike partnerships and affiances with other participants. As for the bride-to-be or groom-to-be who visits the event, there are various new trends to be picked up for that great moment of their lives.

    New Collections
    Most of the participants at the exhibition will be launching their new lines and collections for the season and showcasing them at the exhibition.

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  • CHIKANKRI TO DRAPE THE BRIDE . Aug, 7 2003

    Renu Dadlani has taken intricate art of chikankar from the territory of the traditional and historical and entered it into the exclusive designer-wear segment. Her brainchild, Prateeksha, presents nuances of a pretty bride, draped gorgeously and aglow with emotions, awaiting the embrace of her lover
    . The sentiment is perfected with the soft strokes of chikankari, highlighted on flowing fabrics, their textures and hues varying with the occasion. Renu has tried to give this Lucknowi art an original, modern touch by transcending regional 1 influences. Renu's affair with chikankari began some five years ago, leading her to create a range of formal sarees, suits, lehengas and men's wear in georgette, crepe and tussar. A stickler for quality Renu's repertoire of bridal wear stands out. Whether it is due to the magnetic spread of the fine art of chikankar or due to the hypnotic colours chosen with care, the collection promises a mesmeric interpretation of trousseau.

    Another feature of her collection is that it has Indo-Western style offerings — like wrap-arounds and trousers in eye-catching colours. Renu constantly endeavours to improve on her concepts and de-signs with the help of her dedicated craftsmen. Renu's collection will form part of Celebrating Vivaha 2003 exhibition to be held at the Taj Palace from August 8 to 10.

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  • Chikankari For The Bride? It's Hot! Aug, 4 2003

    DESIGNER RENU Dadlani's affair with chikankari began five years ago when she was contemplating a career that'd help her spend time with family. "I started off designing on basic cottons and slowly discovered chikankari, and thought of giving it a formal look with extra add-ons," she says.
    What makes chikankari different from other fabrics, says Dadlani, is "the fact that it's wearable unlike zardozi, and is a treasure that can be passed on to the next generation". To make this Lucknowi art form more chic, she has used sequins, coloured stones, Swarovski and dabka on it. Expecting more orders after the show than actually from sales at Celebrating Vivaha 2003, where she'll participate for the first time, Dadlani says: "I'm anxiously waiting for the show. It has generated so much curiosity"

    The 100 garments she'll display at the show to be held from August 8-10 at the Taj Palace will have everything from Indo-western attires to georgette kurtis with shararas and lehengas in bright hues. She also has a unique mix of chikankari and gara work. "This is a combination that works well as brides now want to wear something unique," explains Dallani, who drapes some of the biggest industrial names in the city "I've tried to change the image of chikankari from casual garment to a bridal attire," says Dadlani who draws inspiration from Abu Jani-Sandeep Khosla.

    Renu Dadlani will showcase a unique mix of chikankari and gara work at Celebrating Vivaha 2003, because today's brides want something different

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  • Chikankari - Going global sept, 6 2003

    The saying goes: 'It takes one to know one.' And it definetely takes royalty to recognise royalty. Dame Judi Dench flaunted a Chikankari kurti at the Oscars and the late Princess Diana wore similar outfits on many of her tours.
    As far back as one can recall, Chikankari has always been synonymous with Awadh and the nawab-zadas of yore. Petals, rose leaves, lotuses, birds, arabesques and other intricate designs in filigree patterns are what one would find exquisitely embroidered onto a range of fabrics, mainly cotton, silk, georgette, crepe, net and tissue. Right out of Umrao Jaan's regal hot ha to Dame Judi Dench's Hollywood closet, Chikankari has embroidered it's way into the elite international market. "I do Chikankari every year", says Delhi-based designer Ranna Gill, "it's classic, somewhat like a Cashmere shawl, and very well received internationally. Ofcourse if you make it too exquisite and overtly Indian it's not taken too well but contemporary styles are extremely sought after." All leading fashion houses including Christian Dior have successfully experimented with close cousins of chikankari work. "Internationally, chikan is very hot but within extremely elite circles. It's doing pretty well, infact it's doing as well as chicken curry", jokes designer Rohit Bal. Chikankari work has always been associated with ethnic wear and is still a criterion to complete any bridal trousseau, however most designers have had a go at trying to detraditionalise it. "Chikankari has always been seen on traditional outfits so I tried to make it more accessible to the younger lot by introducing it on western apparel as well", says Vivaha and Bridal Asia designer Renu Dadlani, "No one wants the same monotonous colours on the same monotonous styles anymore so I've created sarongs, scarves, kurtis, shararas, straight skirts, western tops, spaghetti tops as well as men's kurtas and kurtis." Chilean is not part only of bridal trousseaus now but is a part of any regular wild-robe. Whether it be formal wear or casual wear, chikan is going global.

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  • A Touch Of Glass In The Trousseau oct, 16 2003

    WHEN ONE thinks of a honeymoon, the first thing that strikes one's imagination is lingerie or sleepwear, but designer Renu Dadlani, better-known for her chikankari ensembles, has deviated from the usual and ventured into what she calls honeymoon wear.
    "Honeymoon wear is an extended part of the wedding trousseau, so I decided to design something sexy and sensual for the bride that she can wear even before and after the honey-moon," informs Dadlani.
    Dadlani has come up with a collection of georgette spaghettis and blouses that can be teamed up with sarongs, pants and straight skirts that have chikankari patterns. "Chikankari is one thing that can never go out of fashion and, besides, this is one embellishment that has done quite well internationally too," says Dadlani.
    Pastel shades of sunset yellow, sober blue and lime green, along with the usual flaming red, white and black comprise the palette that Dadlani has experimented with. She has also come up with a bright range of kurtis that have been done to death by the fashion industry. But Dadlani begs to differ. "For a heavily built woman, kurtis are just the right thing to flaunt and I have people of all age groups buying them."
    The ensembles put together by Dadlani, that, can be seen at the Swiss Embassy on October 18, also make delicate use of sequins and swarovski. Point out to her that sequins have been done to death and it would be nice to see attires minus this embellishment and Dadlani retorts, "They look quite stunning and it totally depends how one uses them."
    Dadlani has also gone a step further and designed an all-white collection of kurtis for men that are priced between Rs 2,500 and Rs 4,000. "I think white looks goods on men and this is one colour that can be teamed up well with trousers and jeans," adds Dadlani.
    Dadlani's collection is surely an example of western sensibilities meeting Judi an embellishments.

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  • Romantic the moon feb, 13 2004

    This Valentine Renu Dadlani has come out with an all-season honeymoon fashion. Breaking the concept of honeymoon wear being lingerie or nightwear, the collection features a casual and sensuous look aimed at tickling the fantasy. Furthermore the collection also sets the tone for joy, happiness and much more.
    The designer's collection is known for its intricate Parsi gara work, Kashmiri needlework, Tilla embroidery Zardosi, Mukaish and Gottapatti. Her outfits include a floor length chikankari anarkali defined by its aesthetic Kashmiri tilla border that cascades down in ripples and a transcendent rust-coloured sari with intricate Kashmiri needle work. She offers an elaborate display of her signature styles under one roof with a broad range of anarkalis, sarees, suit fabrics, lehengas, dupattas and men's kurtas on display.

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Chikankari Lehngas